Barossa

Located less than an hour from Adelaide, the Barossa is arguably Australia’s most well-known wine region and one of many Murray River day trips available.

Rolling hills and vineyards extend as far as the eye can see, making it the perfect spot for a day trip, either by car or on bike. The Barossa features more than 80 cellar doors, including internationally acclaimed wineries such as Penfolds, Henschke and Seppeltsfield.

The picturesque towns of Tanunda, Angaston and Nurioopta offer a variety of gourmet restaurants and eateries, featuring local produce. Stop by Maggie Beer’s Farm Shop and Cafe or the Barossa Farmers Market to meet suppliers, winemakers and the characters that call this award-winning region home.

Group enjoying a wine tasting in Barossa Valley on one of many Murray River day trips
Couple enjoying a wine tasing in Barossa Valley

Hahndorf

The quaint town of Handorf is Australia’s oldest surviving German settlement, built by Prussian settlers back in 1839. The traditional, tree-lined Main Street is filled with German-style pubs, bakeries, smallgoods and gift shops, which sell everything from cuckoo clocks to wooden folk art.

Hahndorf is a food and wine lover’s paradise. Located about 30 minutes’ drive from Adelaide, it’s nestled in the Adelaide Hills, one of the country’s premier wine regions. 

Countless cellar doors are a stone’s throw from the town, including renowned labels Shaw and Smith, Nepenthe and Bird in Hand. 

The town’s many restaurants and bars showcase the region’s stellar wines, while craft breweries and a gin distillery are just down the road. Visitors to Hahndorf also have the opportunity to sample artisan cheeses, honey, smoked goods, chutneys and chocolate made by various producers.

A traditional German pub in Hahndorf, South Australia
An ice cream shop in Hahndorf, South Australia. One of many Murray River Day Trips.

Flinders Ranges

The Flinders Ranges, with its rocky gorges, ancient cliffs and red dirt roads, contains some of Australia’s most stunning scenery. It’s located about 500 kilometres north of Adelaide and includes the Flinders Ranges National Park, with its abundance of native flora and fauna.

Explore Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre, the Aboriginal Dreaming Trail and Wilpena Pound. The massive bowl, which looks like a crater, is almost 100 kilometres wide, and the only way in is through an 11-kilometre-long gorge.

One of the best ways to see this ancient natural structure, though, is from the air. A visit to the Flinders Ranges is also not complete without a ride on a century-old steam train, nicknamed the Coffee Pot, along the Pichi Pichi Railway. The restored locomotive is believed to be the last of its kind in the world and runs on the only remaining portion of the narrow-gauge Ghan railway line, which was built in the 1870s.

People enjoying drinks on a balcony in Flinders Ranges. One of many Murray River Day Trips.
Remains of a collapsed cottage with Flinders Ranges in background


Adelaide

Adelaide, colloquially known as the City of Churches, is the capital city of the state of South Australia. But it’s known for much more than religious structures. Adelaide is a cultural delight. From its numerous festivals to its pristine beaches and sporting achievements at Adelaide Oval, there is something for everyone.

Adelaide is the gateway to some of the world’s best wine regions, so it’s no surprise the city serves up an incredible food and beverage offering. By day, there is the Adelaide Central Market, Glenelg Beach and the Jam Factory. But by late afternoon, it’s time to take a wander down the main and side streets to explore some of the many restaurants, bars and pubs, containing some of the state’s best produce.

Tour group in Adelaide Oval
Horse drawn tour carriage